Citizen mothers at war: the Australian homefront during World War I

McLeod, Fiona (2013). Citizen mothers at war: the Australian homefront during World War I. In: Mobilities and Mobilisations in History: 40th Anniversary of the AHA. 32nd Annual Conference Handbook. AHA 2013: The Australian Historical Association 32nd Annual Conference. Mobilities and Mobilisations in History, Woolongong, NSW, Australia, (79-79). 8-12 July, 2013.

Author McLeod, Fiona
Title of paper Citizen mothers at war: the Australian homefront during World War I
Conference name AHA 2013: The Australian Historical Association 32nd Annual Conference. Mobilities and Mobilisations in History
Conference location Woolongong, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 8-12 July, 2013
Proceedings title Mobilities and Mobilisations in History: 40th Anniversary of the AHA. 32nd Annual Conference Handbook
Place of Publication Woolongong, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian History Association
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
Start page 79
End page 79
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Patriotic Australian women mobilised for World War I in fulfilment of their duty as 'maternal citizens.' They reconfigured temperance and self-control as patriotic virtues, in the cause of the Empire.

While the Australian citizen soldier was at war on Gallipoli, in the trenches in France or the deserts of Palestine, the patriotic women citizens of Australia were looking for ways that they could serve their country during World War I. Factory girls in Melbourne, society matrons in Sydney and mothers with small children in tow in towns and on farms across Australia knitted, sewed, baked and organised to support their menfolk. Amongst the first fully enfranchised women in the world, these women - these citizen mothers - used the pre-war idea of the 'mother of the race' to mobilise women in support of the war. Wartime exigencies gave added power to the 'social purity' agenda of the first-wave feminists and patriotic women reconfigured temperance and self-control as patriotic virtues. This paper examines how private morality and public good were merged in the cause of the Empire. lt highlights how the belief in women's role as 'the guardians and leaders of noble impulses' that drove early feminists to demand the vote became part of the wartime rhetoric of patriotic women. lt proposes that what had previously had little or nothing to do with citizenship became much more closely connected when patriotic women mobilised for war.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 07 Mar 2014, 13:57:38 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry