Sub-tropical water supply reservoirs: a monitoring-modelling-management response to emerging issues

Gibbes, Badin, Grinham, A., Bartkow, M and Watkinson, A (2013). Sub-tropical water supply reservoirs: a monitoring-modelling-management response to emerging issues. In: Charles Lemckert, Proceedings 16th International Workshop on Physical Processes in Natural Waters (PPNW2013). PPNW2013: 16th International Workshop on Physical Processes in Natural Waters, Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia, (37-39). 7-11 July, 2013.

Author Gibbes, Badin
Grinham, A.
Bartkow, M
Watkinson, A
Title of paper Sub-tropical water supply reservoirs: a monitoring-modelling-management response to emerging issues
Conference name PPNW2013: 16th International Workshop on Physical Processes in Natural Waters
Conference location Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 7-11 July, 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings 16th International Workshop on Physical Processes in Natural Waters (PPNW2013)
Journal name Centre for Infrastructure Engineering and Management Technical Report
Place of Publication Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
Publisher Centre for Infrastructure Engineering and Management
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
ISSN 1839-292X
2200-8748
Editor Charles Lemckert
Volume CIEM/2013/R09
Start page 37
End page 39
Total pages 3
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction Sub-tropical water supply reservoirs are under increasing pressure from population driven demand for water resources, transformation and degradation of terrestrial catchments, climate variability and associated increased frequency and severity of extreme weather events (both drought and flood cycles). To mitigate the potential negative impacts of these pressures water resource managers often adopt a monitoring-modelling-management (M-M-M) approach to improve the information on which decisions are based. An overview of the application of a M-M-M approach to address extreme drought in a large sub-tropical water supply reservoir is provided to highlight some challenges and opportunities that the M-M-M approach presents. The study focused on Lake Wivenhoe (27.394022 °S, 152.609334 °E), a sub-tropical, warm monomictic, freshwater reservoir, located 40 km west of Brisbane, Australia. The Lake’s surface area and storage capacity are approximately 10,940 hectares and 1,165,000 Ml respectively at full water supply capcity with an additional 1,450,000 Ml of flood storage. Maximum and average depths are 50 m and 10 m respectively at full water supply capacity. The main catchment inflow is from the 5,438 km2 Upper Brisbane Catchment. The Lake also receives significant inflows via releases from Somerset Dam (located immediately upstream of Lake Wivenhoe on the Stanley River system) and the Splityard Creek hydro-power station (a pumped storage hydroelectric facility that drives both inflows and outflows). Average rainfall and evaporation are approximately 940 mm y-1 and 1,872 mm y-1 respectively [Seqwater, 2005]. The extent of groundwater interactions with the Lake is largely unexplored...
Keyword Water quality monitoring
Hydrodynamic model
Drought
Purified recycled water (PRW)
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Civil Engineering Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 07 Mar 2014, 13:20:24 EST by Julie Hunter on behalf of School of Civil Engineering