Imperial myth-making in the wake of Captain Cook's death

Knellwolf King, Christa (2013). Imperial myth-making in the wake of Captain Cook's death. In: Katrin Rödler and Ilse Wischer, Anglistentag 2012 Potsdam: Proceedings. Anglistentag 2012: Annual Conference of the German Association of University Teachers of English, Potsdam, Germany, (137-148). 19-22 September, 2012.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Knellwolf King, Christa
Title of paper Imperial myth-making in the wake of Captain Cook's death
Conference name Anglistentag 2012: Annual Conference of the German Association of University Teachers of English
Conference location Potsdam, Germany
Conference dates 19-22 September, 2012
Proceedings title Anglistentag 2012 Potsdam: Proceedings
Journal name Proceedings of the Conference of the German Association of University Teachers of English
Place of Publication Trier, Germany
Publisher Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier
Publication Year 2013
Year available 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9783868214888
Editor Katrin Rödler
Ilse Wischer
Volume 34
Start page 137
End page 148
Total pages 12
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In this essay, I want to explore the discursive strategies which were used to engrain the idea of Western superiority in popular consciousness. I will concentrate on the publicity surrounding Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the most famous Briitish naval explorer, in an effort to explain the strategies employed to express proto-irnperialist sentiments. Cook reached an extraordinary place in the public imagination during his lifetime. After his tragic death in Kealakekua Bay on 14 February 1779, when he was killed in an armed controversy between the explorers and the natives, his posthumous reputation reached stellar dimensions. There is no doubt that Cook possessed extraordinary skills and satisfied the expectations of the Royal Navy, which financed his three circumnavigations, in so far as he discovered hitherto unknown parts of the world and made reliable charts. His ethnographic descriptions were also a valuable tool for the assessment of the potential of newly discovered parts of the world for Westem use. This means he responded to his sponsors' and public audience's desire to know whether the places visited by his expedition might either supply valuable goods, such as silk, perfumes and spices, or whether they might offer su itable locations for colonial settlements.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
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Created: Thu, 06 Mar 2014, 09:13:38 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry