Microsatellite and mitochondrial markers reveal strong gene flow barriers for Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Archipelago: implications for malaria vector control

Ambrose, Luke, Cooper, Robert D., Russell, Tanya L., Burkot, Thomas R., Lobo, Neil F., Collins, Frank H., Hii, Jeffrey and Beebe, Nigel W. (2014) Microsatellite and mitochondrial markers reveal strong gene flow barriers for Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Archipelago: implications for malaria vector control. International Journal for Parasitology, 44 3-4: 225-233. doi:10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.12.001


Author Ambrose, Luke
Cooper, Robert D.
Russell, Tanya L.
Burkot, Thomas R.
Lobo, Neil F.
Collins, Frank H.
Hii, Jeffrey
Beebe, Nigel W.
Title Microsatellite and mitochondrial markers reveal strong gene flow barriers for Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Archipelago: implications for malaria vector control
Formatted title
Microsatellite and mitochondrial markers reveal strong gene flow barriers for Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Archipelago: implications for malaria vector control 
Journal name International Journal for Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7519
1879-0135
Publication date 2014-01-16
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.12.001
Open Access Status
Volume 44
Issue 3-4
Start page 225
End page 233
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Anopheles farauti is the primary malaria vector throughout the coastal regions of the Southwest Pacific. A shift in peak biting time from late to early in the night occurred following widespread indoor residue spraying of dichlorodiphenyltrichloro-ethane (DDT) and has persisted in some island populations despite the intervention ending decades ago. We used mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequence data and 12 newly developed microsatellite markers to assess the population genetic structure of this malaria vector in the Solomon Archipelago. With geographically distinct differences in peak A. farauti night biting time observed in the Solomon Archipelago, we tested the hypothesis that strong barriers to gene flow exist in this region. Significant and often large fixation index (FST) values were found between different island populations for the mitochondrial and nuclear markers, suggesting highly restricted gene flow between islands. Some discordance in the location and strength of genetic breaks was observed between the mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. Since early night biting A. farauti individuals occur naturally in all populations, the strong gene flow barriers that we have identified in the Solomon Archipelago lend weight to the hypothesis that the shifts in peak biting time from late to early night have appeared independently in these disconnected island populations. For this reason, we suggest that insecticide impregnated bed nets and indoor residue spraying are unlikely to be effective as control tools against A. farauti occurring elsewhere, and if used, will probably result in peak biting time behavioural shifts similar to that observed in the Solomon Islands. 
Keyword Mosquito behaviour
Selection
Anopheles farauti
Population genetics
Behavioural insecticide resistance
Sex-biased dispersal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 05 Mar 2014, 14:58:04 EST by Nigel Beebe on behalf of School of Biological Sciences