The moderating effect of estimated pre-morbid IQ on the relationship between neuropsychological status and subjective well-being after brain tumour

Ownsworth, Tamara, Dwan, Toni, Chambers, Suzanne, Walker, David G. and Shum, David H. K. (2014) The moderating effect of estimated pre-morbid IQ on the relationship between neuropsychological status and subjective well-being after brain tumour. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 76 3: 257-260. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2013.12.008


Author Ownsworth, Tamara
Dwan, Toni
Chambers, Suzanne
Walker, David G.
Shum, David H. K.
Title The moderating effect of estimated pre-morbid IQ on the relationship between neuropsychological status and subjective well-being after brain tumour
Journal name Journal of Psychosomatic Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3999
1879-1360
Publication date 2014-03
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2013.12.008
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 76
Issue 3
Start page 257
End page 260
Total pages 4
Place of publication Philadelphia, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective
People with brain tumour experience complex and distressing symptoms. Neuropsychological impairment is proposed to have a negative impact on subjective well-being; however, research is yet to examine the influence of estimated premorbid IQ on this relationship. This preliminary study investigated the moderating effect of estimated premorbid IQ on the relationship between global neuropsychological status (GNF) and depression and quality of life.

Methods
73 adults (51% male) aged 21–65 years with primary brain tumour (52% benign) were administered a test battery assessing estimated premorbid IQ, GNF, depression (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales) and quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy, FACT).

Results
A series of two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for education found a significant interaction between estimated premorbid IQ (low average to average vs high average) and GNF (low vs high) on levels of depression (p < .05) and FACT emotional well-being (p < .05). For these outcomes, individuals with high average estimated premorbid IQ and low GNF reported better well-being than those with low-average to average estimated premorbid IQ and low GNF. Higher GNF was related to greater functional well-being (p < .01) irrespective of estimated premorbid IQ.

Conclusion
The finding that higher premorbid cognitive ability buffers the effect of neuropsychological impairment on emotional well-being after brain tumour advances understanding of the role of cognitive reserve in adjustment to neurological disorders.
Keyword Brain tumour
Emotional well-being
Neuropsychological impairment
Quality of life and cognitive reserve
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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