An Australian national panel study of diurnal temperature range and children's respiratory health

Li, Shanshan, Baker, Peter J., Jalaludin,Bin B., Guo, Yuming, Marks, Guy, Denison, Lyn and Williams, Gail (2014) An Australian national panel study of diurnal temperature range and children's respiratory health. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 112 4: 348-353 + e1-e8. doi:10.1016/j.anai.2014.01.007

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Author Li, Shanshan
Baker, Peter J.
Jalaludin,Bin B.
Guo, Yuming
Marks, Guy
Denison, Lyn
Williams, Gail
Title An Australian national panel study of diurnal temperature range and children's respiratory health
Journal name Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1081-1206
1534-4436
Publication date 2014-01-31
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.anai.2014.01.007
Open Access Status
Volume 112
Issue 4
Start page 348
End page 353 + e1-e8
Total pages 14
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Elsevier Inc
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 Background: It is still uncertain whether diurnal temperature range (DTR) affects children’s respiratory function.

Objective: To examine the effects of DTR on lung function and respiratory symptoms for school children with asthma in Australia.

Methods: A panel of 270 children (ages 7-12 years) with asthma living in 6 Australian cities was recruited.  They were asked to perform 3 successive forced expiratory maneuvers using a portable electronic peak flow meter twice daily for 4 weeks. The highest values for peak expiratoryflow (PEF) were stored for each session.  At the same time, they were asked to record their respiratory symptoms (eg, cough and/or phlegm and wheeze and/or chest tightness) every day in the morning (for nighttime symptoms) and evening (for daytime symptoms). Daily data on different metrics of ambient temperature and air pollution were obtained from fixed monitors nearby. Relative humidity data were downloaded from the Weather  nderground
website. Mixed models, adjusting for children’s individual characteristics and air pollution, were used to
examine the effects of DTR on PEF and respiratory symptoms.

Results: DTR had linear effects on PEF and respiratory symptoms. An increase in DTR induced a reduction in PEF and increased the occurrence of respiratory symptoms. In general, the effects lasted for 3 days (lag, 0-2 days). The effects occurred for both boys and girls.

Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that DTR had significant effects on lung function and respiratory
symptoms for children with asthma. These results indicate that it is important and necessary to protect
children with asthma from the effect of unstable weather.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 27 Feb 2014, 10:41:17 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health