Google Glass as a technique of self and the revitalisation of the monad

Graham, Tim and Sauter, Theresa (2013). Google Glass as a technique of self and the revitalisation of the monad. In: Nick Osbaldiston, Catherine Strong and Helen Forbes-Mewett, TASA 2013: Reflections, Intersections and Aspirations; 50 years of Australian Sociology. Proceedings of The Australian Sociological Association 2013 Conference. TASA 2013 Conference, Caulfield, VIC, Australia, (1-13). 25-28 November, 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Graham, Tim
Sauter, Theresa
Title of paper Google Glass as a technique of self and the revitalisation of the monad
Conference name TASA 2013 Conference
Conference location Caulfield, VIC, Australia
Conference dates 25-28 November, 2013
Proceedings title TASA 2013: Reflections, Intersections and Aspirations; 50 years of Australian Sociology. Proceedings of The Australian Sociological Association 2013 Conference
Place of Publication Hawthorn, VIC, Australia
Publisher The Australian Sociological Association (TASA)
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780646911267
Editor Nick Osbaldiston
Catherine Strong
Helen Forbes-Mewett
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In this paper, we use Google’s ‘Project Glass’ - a wearable computing device to be released this year - to feel out what some of the ontological implications of the imminent integration of augmented reality technologies into modern technosocial hybrid societies may be. We seek to bypass the utopian-dystopian dualisms evoked by popular discourse around Glass, to examine how Glass provides another technological technique of self. We build upon the work of Latour et al. (2012) to suggest that Google Glass provides a uniquely interesting case study upon which to test empirically, and hence revitalise, Gabriel Tarde’s concept of the monad as a useful method for tracing and visualising entities in digital networks. We emphasise the importance of considering technologies like Glass not as tools that have an effect on ‘the social’ but rather as just one ingredient in the complex assemblages that mutually shape physical and social landscapes and make up people. We thus avoid simplistic distinctions between the micro vs. the macro (Latour, 1995; Latour et al. 2012) and the online vs. the offline in order to account fully for the mutual interrelation between human and non-human actors in shaping the self and the social.
Keyword Digital sociology
Google glass
Ontology
Subjectivity
Actor network theory
Monad
Social theory
Digital methods
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 25 Feb 2014, 11:52:17 EST by Timothy Graham on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services