‘Dependent’ promises, failed contractual performance, and the influence of civil law on the ‘options’ of the innocent party: White & Carter revisited

Aitken, Lee (2013) ‘Dependent’ promises, failed contractual performance, and the influence of civil law on the ‘options’ of the innocent party: White & Carter revisited. Australian Bar Review, 36 3: 290-301.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Aitken, Lee
Title ‘Dependent’ promises, failed contractual performance, and the influence of civil law on the ‘options’ of the innocent party: White & Carter revisited
Journal name Australian Bar Review
ISSN 0814-8589
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 36
Issue 3
Start page 290
End page 301
Total pages 12
Editor C. G. Lindsay S. C.
Place of publication Chatswood, NSW, Australia
Publisher LexisNexis Butterworths
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject C1
180105 Commercial and Contract Law
Formatted abstract
 White & Carter (Councils) reconfirmed that an ’innocent’ party may fully perform its side of a bargain, and sue for the contract price, if the ’co-operation’ in performance by the other party in breach is not required. This harsh view seems to cut across notions of ’efficient breach’ and underscores the residual importance of specific performance as a remedy. White & Carter (Councils) was a Scots decision of the House of Lords - recent Scottish, and English authority, emphasises the possibility of ’specific implement’ as a condign remedy for breach, a matter arguably insufficiently considered in the area of remedies for breach of contract generally.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
TC Beirne School of Law Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 24 Feb 2014, 13:26:02 EST by Carmen Buttery on behalf of T.C. Beirne School of Law