Can the use of quality assurance tools reduce the impact of surgical complications on the well-being of obstetricians and gynaecologists in Australia and New Zealand?

Varughese, Elizabeth, Janda, Monika and Obermair, Andreas (2014) Can the use of quality assurance tools reduce the impact of surgical complications on the well-being of obstetricians and gynaecologists in Australia and New Zealand?. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 54 1: 30-35. doi:10.1111/ajo.12162


Author Varughese, Elizabeth
Janda, Monika
Obermair, Andreas
Title Can the use of quality assurance tools reduce the impact of surgical complications on the well-being of obstetricians and gynaecologists in Australia and New Zealand?
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8666
1479-828X
Publication date 2014-02
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ajo.12162
Open Access Status
Volume 54
Issue 1
Start page 30
End page 35
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:
While adverse events primarily affect the patient, surgeons involved can also experience considerable distress.

Aims:
The aim of the survey was to assess the impact of complications on the day-to-day life, work and health of Australian and New Zealand obstetricians and gynaecologists and to evaluate existing support systems and coping strategies.

Methods:
A 43-question survey on self-assessment, quality assurance (QA) tools, impact of complications on individuals' health and relationships, and support available was emailed to fellows, trainees, subspecialists and subspecialty trainees of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (RANZCOG). We collected 606 responses from a target population of 2296 (response rate 26.3%).

Results:
When complications occur, sleep was affected of 80%, family and social relationships of 55% and physical health of 48% of respondents. The major sources of support were from colleagues (83%), family (82%) and medical defence organisations (73%), with professional bodies perceived as providing least support. Nearly 80% of respondents felt the need to talk to someone they trust during times of complications. Overall, 100% of respondents used at least one QA tool (62% used two, 26% three and 9% four QA strategies). There were significant differences between respondent groups in use of the QA tools.

Conclusions:
Surgical complications have a significant impact on the well-being of Australian and New Zealand obstetricians and gynaecologists. Existing support comes from colleagues and family, but structured, unbiased support for surgeons from a professional source is urgently warranted.
Keyword Adverse events
Gynaecologists' health
Obstetricians' health
Quality assurance
Surgical complications
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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