A qualitative analysis of role conflict among indigenous police liaison officers in Queensland

Mayes, Sarah (2006). A qualitative analysis of role conflict among indigenous police liaison officers in Queensland Honours Thesis, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Mayes, Sarah
Thesis Title A qualitative analysis of role conflict among indigenous police liaison officers in Queensland
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2006
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Eric Chui
Christine Bond
Total pages 50
Language eng
Subjects L
390403 Police Administration, Procedures and Practice
220107 Professional Ethics (incl. police and research ethics)
Formatted abstract

Indigenous Police Liaison Officers (IPLOs) are employed by the Queensland Police Service (QPS) to address the social and cultural barriers between police and Indigenous communities. Their position as mediators and members of two historically opposing groups, potentially exposes them to conflicting expectations that hinder their ability to carry out their liaison role effectively. This thesis aims to investigate the different ways IPLOs perceive their role/s to be conflicting, and secondly, to understand how those conflicts are perceived in relation to the concepts of 'inter-role' and 'intra-role' conflict. From six qualitative interviews with IPLOs, this study has found that they experience role conflict through a number of factors, including: lack of training, unclear role definition and poor management and coordination. In addition, it was revealed that organisational issues within the QPS formed the dominant conflict context (intra-role conflict), rather than the expected cultural context, whereby cultural and professional roles conflict (inter-role conflict). The findings of this research not only demonstrate a more effective application of the role conflict concept, but they also suggest that the solution for the role conflict issues among IPLOs may lie with a straightforward redress of QPS policies and procedures.

Keyword Aboriginal Australians -- Queensland -- Criminal justice system
Police-community relations -- Queensland
Aboriginal Australians -- Criminal justice system -- Queensland
Police -- Australia

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Feb 2014, 14:06:37 EST by Nicole Rayner on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service