Internet-based surveillance systems for monitoring emerging infectious diseases

Milinovich, Gabriel J., Williams, Gail M., Clements, Archie C. A. and Hu, Wenviao (2014) Internet-based surveillance systems for monitoring emerging infectious diseases. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 14 2: 160-168. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70244-5


Author Milinovich, Gabriel J.
Williams, Gail M.
Clements, Archie C. A.
Hu, Wenviao
Title Internet-based surveillance systems for monitoring emerging infectious diseases
Journal name The Lancet Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-3099
1474-4457
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70244-5
Volume 14
Issue 2
Start page 160
End page 168
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Lancet Publishing Group
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2725 Infectious Diseases
Abstract Emerging infectious diseases present a complex challenge to public health officials and governments; these challenges have been compounded by rapidly shifting patterns of human behaviour and globalisation. The increase in emerging infectious diseases has led to calls for new technologies and approaches for detection, tracking, reporting, and response. Internet-based surveillance systems offer a novel and developing means of monitoring conditions of public health concern, including emerging infectious diseases. We review studies that have exploited internet use and search trends to monitor two such diseases: influenza and dengue. Internet-based surveillance systems have good congruence with traditional surveillance approaches. Additionally, internet-based approaches are logistically and economically appealing. However, they do not have the capacity to replace traditional surveillance systems; they should not be viewed as an alternative, but rather an extension. Future research should focus on using data generated through internet-based surveillance and response systems to bolster the capacity of traditional surveillance systems for emerging infectious diseases.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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