Corridors and callitris : examining the changing use of environment, through the Gledswood Shelter 1 wood charcoal assemblage

Carah, Xavier (2010). Corridors and callitris : examining the changing use of environment, through the Gledswood Shelter 1 wood charcoal assemblage Honours Thesis, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Carah, Xavier
Thesis Title Corridors and callitris : examining the changing use of environment, through the Gledswood Shelter 1 wood charcoal assemblage
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Andrew Fairbairn
Lynley Wallis
Total pages 176
Language eng
Subjects L
430200 Archaeology and Prehistory
Formatted abstract

The investigation of new archaeological sites and the application of new techniques of inquiry extend our understanding of humans in the past and their interactions with their environment. The rockshelter site of Gledswood Shelter 1 (GSI), northwest Queensland, provides an opportunity to investigate the key archaeological models of this region. Horton's (1981) 'water and woodland' colonisation model; Hiscock (1984) and Veth's (1989, 1993) LGM settlement models and the proposal of a Holocene seed grinding economy by Morwood (1990), and Gorecki and Grant (1994) for the northwest region have all been explored through the analysis of the GSI wood charcoal assemblage.

The construction of a wood reference collection, composed of the significant taxa of the region, was the initial concern of this research. This collection of charred reference wood was used to identify archaeological wood charcoal specimens from four temporally significant phases. Through the identification of these specimens the palaeoenvironment surrounding this site was reconstructed and the key regional archaeological models assessed. Wood charcoal analysis can provide a palaeoenvironmental dataset in environments that do not support palynological catchments (i.e. lakes, swamps). Wood charcoal analysis provides valuable insights into the palaeoenvironment, even in the arid/semi-arid environments of the Australian continent.

Keyword Archaeology - Australia
Stone arrangements
Wood formation

 
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Created: Mon, 17 Feb 2014, 10:07:08 EST by Nicole Rayner on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service