Running intensity as determined by heart rate is the same in fast and slow runners in both the 10- and 21-km races

Selley, E. A., Kolbe, T., Van Zyl, C. G., Noakes T. D. and Lambert, M. I. (1995) Running intensity as determined by heart rate is the same in fast and slow runners in both the 10- and 21-km races. Journal of Sports Sciences, 13 5: 405-410. doi:10.1080/02640419508732256


Author Selley, E. A.
Kolbe, T.
Van Zyl, C. G.
Noakes T. D.
Lambert, M. I.
Title Running intensity as determined by heart rate is the same in fast and slow runners in both the 10- and 21-km races
Journal name Journal of Sports Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-0414
1466-447X
Publication date 1995
Year available 1995
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02640419508732256
Open Access Status
Volume 13
Issue 5
Start page 405
End page 410
Total pages 6
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The aims of this study were to determine (1) whether running speed is directly proportional to heart rate (HR) during field testing and during 10‐ and 21‐km races, and (2) whether running intensity, as estimated from HR measurements, differs in 10‐ and 21‐km races and between slow and fast runners at those running distances. Male runners were divided into a fast (65–80 min for 21 km; n = 8) or slow (85–110 min for 21 km; n = 8) group. They then competed in 10‐ and 21‐km races while wearing HR monitors. All subjects also ran in a field test in which HR was measured while they ran at predetermined speeds. The 10‐km time was significantly less in the fast compared with the slow group (33:15 ± 1:42 vs 40:07 ± 3:01 min:s; x ± s.d.), as was 21‐km time (74:19 ± 4:30 vs 94:13 ± 9:54 min:s) (P < 0.01). Despite the differences in running speed, the average running intensity (%HRmax) for the fast and slow groups in the 10‐km race was 90 ± 1 vs 89 ± 3% and in the 21‐km race 91 ± 1 vs 89 ± 2%, respectively. In addition, %HRmax was consistently lower in the field test at the comparative average running speeds sustained in the 10‐km (P < 0.01) and 21‐km (P < 0.001) races. Hence, factors in addition to work rate or running speed influence the HR response during competitive racing. This finding must be considered when running intensity for competitive events is prescribed on the basis of field testing performed under non‐competitive conditions in fast and slow runners.
Keyword Heart rate
Racing performance
Running intensity
VO2 max
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 17 Feb 2014, 09:15:55 EST by Ms Kate Rowe on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences