The validity of the distress thermometer in prostate cancer populations

Chambers, Suzanne K., Zajdlewicz, Leah, Youlden, Danny R., Holland, Jimmie C. and Dunn, Jeff (2014) The validity of the distress thermometer in prostate cancer populations. Psycho-Oncology, 23 2: 195-203. doi:10.1002/pon.3391


Author Chambers, Suzanne K.
Zajdlewicz, Leah
Youlden, Danny R.
Holland, Jimmie C.
Dunn, Jeff
Title The validity of the distress thermometer in prostate cancer populations
Journal name Psycho-Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1057-9249
1099-1611
Publication date 2014
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/pon.3391
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Issue 2
Start page 195
End page 203
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Background The Distress Thermometer (DT) is widely recommended for screening for distress after cancer. However, the validity of the DT in men with prostate cancer and over differing time points from diagnosis has not been well examined. Method Receiver operating characteristics analyses were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the DT compared with three commonly used standardised scales in two prospective and one cross-sectional survey of men with prostate cancer (n = 740, 189 and 463, respectively). Comparison scales included the Impact of Event Scale - Revised (IES-R, Study 1), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, Study 2) and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18, Study 3). Results Study 1: the DT showed good accuracy against the IES-R at all time points (area under curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.84 to 0.88) and sensitivity was high (>85%). Study 2: the DT performed well against both the anxiety and depression subscales for HADS at baseline (AUC = 0.84 and 0.82, respectively), but sensitivity decreased substantially after 12 months. Study 3: validity was high for the anxiety (AUC = 0.90, sensitivity = 90%) and depression (AUC = 0.85, sensitivity = 74%) subscales of the BSI-18 but was poorer for somatization (AUC = 0.67, sensitivity = 52%). A DT cut-off between ≥3 and ≥6 maximised sensitivity and specificity across analyses. Conclusions The DT is a valid tool to detect cancer-specific distress, anxiety and depression among prostate cancer patients, particularly close to diagnosis. A cut-off of ≥4 may be optimal soon after diagnosis, and for longer-term assessments, ≥3 was supported.
Keyword Distress screening
Distress thermometer
Prostate cancer
Psychosocial care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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