The perceived role and influencers of physical activity among pregnant women from low socioeconomic status communities in South Africa

Muzigaba, Moise, Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L. and Wong, Fiona (2013) The perceived role and influencers of physical activity among pregnant women from low socioeconomic status communities in South Africa. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, In Press 1-31.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Muzigaba, Moise
Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L.
Wong, Fiona
Title The perceived role and influencers of physical activity among pregnant women from low socioeconomic status communities in South Africa
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2013-10-31
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume In Press
Start page 1
End page 31
Total pages 31
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Facility-based and context-specific interventions to promote physical activity (PA) among pregnant women from economically underprivileged communities remain sparse and undocumented in South Africa. This study aimed to generate information about pregnant women’s views and experiences of PA during pregnancy, which will later be used to inform the development of a PA-based intervention targeting this group.

Methods: Qualitative methods were used and framed on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Five focus group discussions were conducted at a Community Health Centre in Cape Town, each comprising a stratified random sample of between 8 and 6 pregnant women living in eight low socioeconomic status communities close to the facility. The participants included primi- and multi-gravida black and mixed racial ancestry women at different stages of pregnancy. Data were analyzed using a Framework approach.

Results: PA was considered important for self and the baby for most participants. However, they reported a number of barriers for translating intentions into action including the lack of supportive environment, fear of hurting oneself and the growing baby, lack of time due to work and family responsibilities, and not knowing which and how much PA is safe to do. Some of the incentives to engage in PA included establishing community-based group exercise clubs, initiating antenatal PA education and PA sessions during antenatal visits.

Conclusion: Based on our findings the need for an intervention to promote PA in pregnancy is evident. Such an intervention should, however, aim at addressing barriers reported in this study, particularly those related to the behavioral context.
Keyword Physical activity
Determinants
Pregnancy
Poor communities
South Africa
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes E pub ahead of print

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 13 Feb 2014, 14:50:38 EST by Tracy Kolbe-alexander on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences