The impact of the new translation of The Second Sex: rediscovering Beauvoir

Daigle, Christine (2013) The impact of the new translation of The Second Sex: rediscovering Beauvoir. Journal of Speculative Philosophy, 27 3: 336-347. doi:10.1353/jsp.2013.0021

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Author Daigle, Christine
Title The impact of the new translation of The Second Sex: rediscovering Beauvoir
Formatted title
The impact of the new translation of The Second Sex: rediscovering Beauvoir
Journal name Journal of Speculative Philosophy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0891-625X
1527-9383
Publication date 2013-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1353/jsp.2013.0021
Volume 27
Issue 3
Start page 336
End page 347
Total pages 12
Place of publication University Park, PA, United States
Publisher Pennsylvania State University Press
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
...The new translation was published in 2009 in the United Kingdom and was made available one year later in the United States. By now, readers have had the time to reacquaint themselves with the work and have had the time to assess the new translation. The one important thing about it is that it is the first complete translation. Nothing has been left out of this one. This means that readers familiar with the previous translation have discovered entire and sometimes lengthy passages that they did not know about. If a new edition of the work in English had done just that, it would already be a good thing. But the translators have also aimed at fixing the problems of Parshley’s translation. In their “Translators’ Note,” Constance Borde and Sheila Malovany-Chevallier indicate that they have “translated Le deuxième sexe as it was written, unabridged and unsimplified, maintaining Beauvoir’s philosophical language.” They also say that they “were keenly aware of the need to put the philosopher back into her text. To transpose her philosophical style and voice into English was the most crucial task we faced.” In order to do this, and lacking the philosophical training themselves, they secured the collaboration of a good number of Beauvoir scholars to look at their translation and offer advice, suggestions, and corrections. As they explain, they sometimes received contradictory advice and had to make decisions, entirely their own...
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes SPEP 2013: Special Issue with the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. "This volume of essays brings together some of the highlights from the fifty-first annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy (SPEP), November 1–3, 2012."

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Tue, 11 Feb 2014, 21:48:04 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry