When will collective action be effective? Violent and non-violent protests differentially influence perceptions of legitimacy and efficacy among sympathizers

Thomas, Emma F. and Louis, Winnifred R. (2014) When will collective action be effective? Violent and non-violent protests differentially influence perceptions of legitimacy and efficacy among sympathizers. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40 2: 263-276. doi:10.1177/0146167213510525


Author Thomas, Emma F.
Louis, Winnifred R.
Title When will collective action be effective? Violent and non-violent protests differentially influence perceptions of legitimacy and efficacy among sympathizers
Journal name Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0146-1672
1552-7433
Publication date 2014
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0146167213510525
Open Access Status
Volume 40
Issue 2
Start page 263
End page 276
Total pages 14
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Collective action will be effective in achieving broader social change goals to the extent that it influences public opinion yet the degree to which collective action "works" in changing opinion is rarely studied. Experiment 1 (n = 158) showed that, consistent with a logic of strategic non-violence, non-violent collective action more effectively conveys a sense of the illegitimacy of the issue and the efficacy of the group, thereby promoting support for future non-violent actions. Experiment 2 (n = 139) explored the moderating role of allegations of corruption. A social context of corruption effectively undermined the efficacy and legitimacy of non-violent collective action, relative to support for violence, thereby promoting (indirectly) support for future extreme action. The implications of this research, for the logic of strategic non-violence and mobilizing supportive public opinion, are discussed.
Keyword Collective action
Efficacy
Extremism
Legitimacy
Political decision-making
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 09 Feb 2014, 00:14:32 EST by System User on behalf of School of Psychology