A Critique of the Militarisation of Australian History and Culture Thesis: The Case of Anzac Battlefield Tourism

McKay, Jim (2013) A Critique of the Militarisation of Australian History and Culture Thesis: The Case of Anzac Battlefield Tourism. PORTAL Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies,, 10 1: .

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Author McKay, Jim
Title A Critique of the Militarisation of Australian History and Culture Thesis: The Case of Anzac Battlefield Tourism
Journal name PORTAL Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies,   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1449-2490
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 10
Issue 1
Total pages 25
Place of publication Sydney, NSW Australia
Publisher University of Technology, Sydney * Institute for International Studies
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This paper analyses the militarisation of Australian history and culture thesis with specific reference to the increasing popularity of Anzac battlefield tourism. I argue that the militarisation thesis contains ontological and epistemological flaws that render it incapable of understanding the multifaceted ways in which Australians experience Anzac battlefield tours. I then argue that in order to study how Australians both at home and overseas respond to the upcoming Anzac Centenary researchers will need to deploy an empirically-grounded and multidisciplinary framework. I demonstrate how proponents of militarisation: (1) ignore the polymorphous properties of Anzac myths; (2) are complicit with constructions of ‘moral panics’ about young Australian tourists; (3) overlook the reflexive capacities of teachers, students and tourists with respect to military history and battlefield tours; and (4) disregard the complex and contradictory aspects of visits to battlefields. My counter-narrative relies both on Stuart Hall’s work on popular culture and empirical studies of battlefield tourism from myriad disciplines.
Keyword Anzac
Battlefield tourism
Military history
Militarisation
Mythologies
Nationalism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 22 Jan 2014, 15:22:49 EST by Rebecca Ralph on behalf of Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies