Modification of humpback whale social sound repertoire and vocal source levels with increased noise

Dunlop, Rebecca, Noad, Michael and Cato, Douglas (2013). Modification of humpback whale social sound repertoire and vocal source levels with increased noise. In: Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: ICA 2013 Montreal. ICA 2013: 21st International Congress on Acoustics, Montréal, QC, Canada, (010058.1-010058.6). 2-7 June, 2013. doi:10.1121/1.4799213

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Author Dunlop, Rebecca
Noad, Michael
Cato, Douglas
Title of paper Modification of humpback whale social sound repertoire and vocal source levels with increased noise
Conference name ICA 2013: 21st International Congress on Acoustics
Conference location Montréal, QC, Canada
Conference dates 2-7 June, 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: ICA 2013 Montreal   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Melville, NY, United States
Publisher Acoustical Society of America
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1121/1.4799213
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
ISSN 1939-800X
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 010058.1
End page 010058.6
Total pages 6
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
High background noise is an important obstacle in successful receiver signal detection and perception of an acoustic signal. To overcome this problem, animals modify acoustic signals by increasing the repetition rate, duration, amplitude, or frequency range of the signal. Humpback whales are the most vocal of the baleen species in that they use a wide and varied catalogue of social sounds. More than 36 different sound types (vocal sounds and sounds from energetic surface behaviours) were found during a three year study on migrating humpback whales. During periods of high wind noise, humpback whales modify both their acoustic repertoire as well as vocal signal properties. We found that humpback whale groups gradually switched from primarily vocal to primarily surface-generated communication in increasing wind speeds and background noise levels, but kept both signal types in their repertoire. We also found evidence of the Lombard effect, in that in increased wind-dominated background noise levels, humpback whale groups tended to increase the amplitude of their vocalisations. Determining how whales modify their vocal behaviour in increasing levels of background noise will give us an important insight into how they might cope with increasing levels of anthropogenic noise.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 02 June 2013

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Jan 2014, 13:56:52 EST by Dr Rebecca Dunlop on behalf of School of Veterinary Science