Undergraduate research and human rights: an Australian case study on human trafficking and migrant smuggling

Curley, Melissa and Schloenhardt, Andreas (2014) Undergraduate research and human rights: an Australian case study on human trafficking and migrant smuggling. Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly, 34 3: 24-29.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Curley, Melissa
Schloenhardt, Andreas
Title Undergraduate research and human rights: an Australian case study on human trafficking and migrant smuggling
Journal name Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1072-5830
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 34
Issue 3
Start page 24
End page 29
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, United States
Publisher Council on Undergraduate Research
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject C1
180199 Law not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
This article describes a pilot teaching collaboration at the University of Queensland involving inquiry-based, interdisciplinary learning in the undergraduate curriculum, specifically in the study of human trafficking and smuggling of migrants. It describes collaboration between the university’s School of Political Science and International Studies and its School of Law to facilitate a student working group to plan, present, and disseminate students’ research on this topic. An interdisciplinary learning environment was encouraged by having two academics, one from each of the schools, facilitate the working group.

We argue that the inquiry-based learning (IBL) format, as exemplified by the working group, has advantages to offer human-rights educators. These advantages include teaching techniques and assessment approaches that help to highlight the importance of information sources, and the role of disciplinary knowledge and student’s own belief systems within human-rights research. The discussion of “research” in this article is largely related to “the student experience of appreciating, using and doing research” (Jenkins 2002, 3, original emphasis).
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Spring 2014.

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Jan 2014, 13:24:33 EST by Carmen Buttery on behalf of T.C. Beirne School of Law