Endocrine impact of Helicobacter pylori: focus on ghrelin and ghrelin o-acyltransferase

Jeffery, Penny L., McGuckin, Michael A. and Linden, Sara K. (2011) Endocrine impact of Helicobacter pylori: focus on ghrelin and ghrelin o-acyltransferase. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 17 10: 1249-1260. doi:10.3748/wjg.v17.i10.1249

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Author Jeffery, Penny L.
McGuckin, Michael A.
Linden, Sara K.
Title Endocrine impact of Helicobacter pylori: focus on ghrelin and ghrelin o-acyltransferase
Formatted title
Endocrine impact of Helicobacter pylori: focus on ghrelin and ghrelin o-acyltransferase
Journal name World Journal of Gastroenterology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1007-9327
2219-2840
Publication date 2011-03-14
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.3748/wjg.v17.i10.1249
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 17
Issue 10
Start page 1249
End page 1260
Total pages 12
Place of publication Beijing, China
Publisher Beijing Baishideng BioMed Scientific
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Ghrelin is predominantly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment and is octanoylated by the recently discovered ghrelin o-acyltransferase (GOAT) before secretion into the bloodstream. This octanoylation is essential for many of the biological properties of ghrelin including appetite stimulation and anti-inflammatory properties as only the acylated form of ghrelin binds to the ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Given the gastric location of ghrelin production, it is perhaps not surprising that insult to the gastric mucosa affects circulating ghrelin levels in humans. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than fifty percent of the world’s population and once established within the gastric mucosa, can persist for life. Infection is associated with chronic gastritis, gastric atrophy and ulceration, reduced appetite and a lower body mass index (BMI). The large majority of studies investigating levels of circulating ghrelin and ghrelin expression in the stomach in patients with H. pylori infection indicate that the bacterium has a negative impact on ghrelin production and/or secretion. Eradication of infection restores ghrelin, improves appetite and increases BMI in some studies, however, a causative relationship between H. pylori-associated serum ghrelin decline and food intake and obesity has not been established. Most studies measure total ghrelin in the circulation although the measurement of the ratio of acyl/total ghrelin gives a clearer indication that the ghrelin acylation process is altered during infection and atrophy. GOAT is essential for the production of biologically-active, acyl ghrelin and the impact of H. pylori on GOAT expression and activity will be highly informative in the future.
Keyword Appetite
Ghrelin
Ghrelin o-acyltransferase
Helicobacter pylori
Infection
Inflammation
Obesity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 14 Jan 2014, 17:44:34 EST by Michael Mcguckin on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences