Why has Melbourne closed the gap on Sydney since 2000?

Searle, Glen and O'Connor, Kevin (2013). Why has Melbourne closed the gap on Sydney since 2000?. In: Kristian Ruming, Bill Randolph and Nicole Gurran, State of Australian Cities Conference 2013 Reviewed Proceedings. SOAC 2013: 6th State of Australian Cities Conference, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (1-11). 26-29 November, 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Searle, Glen
O'Connor, Kevin
Title of paper Why has Melbourne closed the gap on Sydney since 2000?
Conference name SOAC 2013: 6th State of Australian Cities Conference
Conference location Sydney, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 26-29 November, 2013
Proceedings title State of Australian Cities Conference 2013 Reviewed Proceedings
Place of Publication Hobart, TAS, Australia
Publisher State of Australian Cities Research Network
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN TBC
Editor Kristian Ruming
Bill Randolph
Nicole Gurran
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Since 2000 Melbourne has grown faster than Sydney in population and employment. This is despite Sydney’s advantages in 2000 in having greater prominence as a global city, with stronger finance and advanced producer services sectors, and high visibility from hosting the Olympic Games. The paper examines a number of hypotheses as to why Melbourne grew more despite such initial Sydney advantages. Depressed global conditions for Sydney’s global sectors, especially finance and tourism, are the basis of an initial hypothesis. Higher housing and land costs in Sydney are also hypothesised to have reduced housing construction and land-intensive activities such as manufacturing and logistics, and reduced growth in immigration, tourism and international student intakes, relative to Melbourne. Sub-hypotheses as to why there were higher housing and land costs in Sydney are examined, together with the notion of a possible Melbourne housing ‘bubble’. Lower state spending on tourism and inward investment in Sydney, coupled with less effective state development administration and complacency, are also incorporated into hypotheses. Differences between the cities in transport performance are additionally considered as a causative factor. Finally, the potential influence of a mooted more complex planning system in Sydney is examined. The paper uses ABS 4-digit employment data and housing price data, airline traffic trends, Productivity Commission reports and newspaper reports, inter alia, to test hypotheses.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 11 Jan 2014, 06:06:30 EST by Associate Professor Glen Searle on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management