Legal frameworks for unique ecosystems – how can the EPBC Act offsets policy address the impact of development on seagrass?

Bell, Justine, Saunders, Megan I., Lovelock, Catherine E. and Possingham, Hugh P. (2014) Legal frameworks for unique ecosystems – how can the EPBC Act offsets policy address the impact of development on seagrass?. Environmental and Planning Law Journal, 31 1: 34-46.

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Author Bell, Justine
Saunders, Megan I.
Lovelock, Catherine E.
Possingham, Hugh P.
Title Legal frameworks for unique ecosystems – how can the EPBC Act offsets policy address the impact of development on seagrass?
Journal name Environmental and Planning Law Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0813-300X
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 31
Issue 1
Start page 34
End page 46
Total pages 13
Place of publication Rozelle, NSW, Australia
Publisher Lawbook
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Environmental or biodiversity offset policies allow for impacts occurring at one site to be offset through activities at another site. The federal government has recently released a policy for offsetting the impacts of activities approved under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (EPBC Act). The EPBC Act policy can be used to offset impacts on terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and one of the first applications of the policy has been to offset impacts on seagrass meadows at risk due to the Abbot Point coal terminal expansion. The significant ecological differences between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, such as seagrass meadows, require different management approaches to ensure that impacts are offset. This article analyses the EPBC Act policy to determine whether it adequately caters for offsetting impacts on marine ecosystems, with seagrass used as an example. It concludes with recommendations for policy change directed at ensuring that the unique characteristics of seagrass ecosystems are considered in offset policies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 10 Jan 2014, 11:16:31 EST by Dr Justine Bell on behalf of T.C. Beirne School of Law