Drinking patterns and attitudes for young people in inner-urban Melbourne and outer-urban growth areas: differences and similarities

MacLean, Sarah, Ferris, Jason and Livingston, Michael (2013) Drinking patterns and attitudes for young people in inner-urban Melbourne and outer-urban growth areas: differences and similarities. Urban Policy and Research, 31 4: 417-434. doi:10.1080/08111146.2013.831758

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Author MacLean, Sarah
Ferris, Jason
Livingston, Michael
Title Drinking patterns and attitudes for young people in inner-urban Melbourne and outer-urban growth areas: differences and similarities
Journal name Urban Policy and Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0811-1146
1476-7244
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08111146.2013.831758
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 31
Issue 4
Start page 417
End page 434
Total pages 18
Place of publication Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 3322 Urban Studies
3305 Geography, Planning and Development
Abstract Despite new patterns of socio-spatial polarisation, cities are generally treated as homogenous places in analyses of alcohol consumption. To inform local alcohol policy, we compared alcohol measures for young people in inner-urban Melbourne and outer-urban growth areas using data from the 2009 Victorian Youth Alcohol and Drug Survey. Young people in inner Melbourne reported more liberal attitudes to drinking than their peers in growth areas. Regular strength beer was more usually consumed in inner Melbourne against premixed spirits in growth areas, and drinking at licensed venues was more usual in inner Melbourne. Respondents below the legal drinking age of 18 in inner Melbourne were more likely to have purchased alcohol and to have consumed alcohol in a licensed premise during the past year. As findings were only slightly altered by adjusting for age, sex and socio-economic status, it is likely that these differences relate to local drinking cultures, alcohol outlet density and the range of leisure activities available for young adults. Measures to reduce heavy episodic drinking through restricting alcohol availability are relevant to both inner and growth area settings. Enforcement of provisions banning alcohol sales to minors is particularly indicated in inner Melbourne. Growth area responses might focus on cautious outlet density planning.
Keyword Alcohol
Growth area
Inner city
Melbourne
Outer urban
Peri-urban
Young people
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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