Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic wrench tectonics in eastern Australia: insights from the North Pine Fault System (southeast Queensland)

Babaahmadi, A. and Rosenbaum, G. (2014) Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic wrench tectonics in eastern Australia: insights from the North Pine Fault System (southeast Queensland). Journal of Geodynamics, 73 83-99. doi:10.1016/j.jog.2013.10.001


Author Babaahmadi, A.
Rosenbaum, G.
Title Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic wrench tectonics in eastern Australia: insights from the North Pine Fault System (southeast Queensland)
Journal name Journal of Geodynamics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-3707
1879-1670
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jog.2013.10.001
Volume 73
Start page 83
End page 99
Total pages 17
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract The North Pine Fault System (NPFS) in SE Queensland belongs to a series of NNW-striking sinistral faults that displaced Paleozoic to Cenozoic rock units in eastern Australia. We have studied the geometry and kinematics of the NPFS by utilizing gridded aeromagnetic data, digital elevation models, and field observations. The results indicate that all segments of the NPFS were subjected to sinistral reverse strike-slip faulting. Restorations of displaced magnetic anomalies indicate sinistral offsets ranging from ∼3.4 to ∼8.2 km. The existence of a (possibly) Late Triassic granophyre dyke parallel to one of the fault segments, and the occurrence of NNW-striking steeply dipping strike-slip and normal faults in the Late Triassic-Early Cretaceous Maryborough Basin, indicate that the NPFS has likely been active during the Mesozoic. We propose that from Late Cretaceous to early Eocene, NNW-striking faults in eastern Australia, including the NPFS, were reactivated with oblique sinistral-normal kinematics in response to regional oblique extension associated with the opening of the Tasman and Coral Seas. This interpretation is consistent with the modeled dominant NNE- to NNW-directed horizontal tensional stress in the Eocene. The latest movements along the NPFS involved sinistral transpressional kinematics, which was possibly related to far-field contractional stresses from collisional tectonics at the eastern and northern boundaries of the Australian plate in the Cenozoic. This sinistral-reverse oblique kinematics of the NPFS in the Cenozoic is in line with ∼ESE to ENE orientations of the modeled maximum horizontal stress in SE Queensland.
Keyword North Pine Fault System
Eastern Australian sedimentary basins
Late Cretaceous-early Cenozoic extension
Strike-slip faults
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 9 October 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 18 Dec 2013, 01:00:07 EST by Ashleigh Paroz on behalf of School of Earth Sciences