Clinical features of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome at seven hospitals on the east coast of Australia

Blum, Stefan, Reddel, Stephen, Spies, Judy and McCombe, Pamela (2013) Clinical features of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome at seven hospitals on the east coast of Australia. Journal of The Peripheral Nervous System, 18 4: 316-320. doi:10.1111/jns5.12045


Author Blum, Stefan
Reddel, Stephen
Spies, Judy
McCombe, Pamela
Title Clinical features of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome at seven hospitals on the east coast of Australia
Formatted title
Clinical features of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome at seven hospitals on the east coast of Australia
Journal name Journal of The Peripheral Nervous System   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1085-9489
1529-8027
Publication date 2013-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jns5.12045
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 316
End page 320
Total pages 5
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
To document the clinical features of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in Australia, we performed a retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to several hospitals along the East Coast of Australia from 2000 to 2012. Using hospital records, we reviewed all patients with a diagnosis of GBS admitted to seven hospitals. From these, we report information of subjects who fulfilled standard diagnostic criteria. We excluded patients where inadequate information was available or who were under the age of 18. We report the features of 335 patients, in 228 of whom neurophysiological data were available. There were 168 cases of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), 17 of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), 4 of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and 35 of Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS). The median age at onset was 52.5 years (18–89 years) with a male : female ratio of 1.61 : 1. Upper respiratory tract infections were the most frequently identified trigger (151 subjects, 44.5%). Most patients were severely affected, with 42.7% of subjects bedbound, and an additional 24% requiring ventilatory support. GBS affects adults of all ages and usually follows a severe clinical course. In contrast to other autoimmune diseases, males are more frequently affected. A wide variety of triggering factors leads to a relatively stereotypical clinical syndrome. The most common variant of GBS in Australia is AIDP. This study shows that the clinical features of GBS in Australia are similar to that previously reported and confirms the male predominance, increased incidence with age, and frequent evidence of peripheral nerve demyelination as features of GBS.
Keyword Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy
Australia
Epidemiology
Guillain-Barre syndrome
Seasonal variation
Guillain-Barré syndrome
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 16 Dec 2013, 20:31:45 EST by Roheen Gill on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research