Starch trek, the search for residue : an examination of the relationship between technological change and resource exploitation at Platypus Rockshelter (KB:A70), southeast Queensland

Skelton, Stephen M (1996). Starch trek, the search for residue : an examination of the relationship between technological change and resource exploitation at Platypus Rockshelter (KB:A70), southeast Queensland Other, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Skelton, Stephen M
Thesis Title Starch trek, the search for residue : an examination of the relationship between technological change and resource exploitation at Platypus Rockshelter (KB:A70), southeast Queensland
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1996-01-01
Thesis type Other
Supervisor Jay Hall
Tom Loy
Total pages 127
Collection year 1996
Language eng
Subjects 1601 Anthropology
Formatted abstract

This study examines the relationship between technological change and resource exploitation at Platypus Rockshelter. Technological change at the site has been interpreted as signifying "alterations to the nature of tool use and/or plant processing activities" (Hiscock and Hall 1988a:76). Techniques of use-wear (e.g. analysis of archaeological use-wear and replication experiments) and residue analysis were used to examine changes in the exploitation of resources. To detect and identify archaeological residues, four methods of residue analysis were employed, including microscopy, the Hemastix™ and staphylococcal protein A tests, and starch grain analysis. All artefacts from the representative sample exhibited plant residues, including starch grains, cellulosic tissue and raphides (calcium oxalate crystals). Interestingly, only one artefact tested positive for blood. Results indicate that technological change is not related to resource exploitation at Platypus Rockshelter. Plant processing occurs in all the stratigraphic units examined, and spans the major period of technological change. These surprising results indicate that the exploitation of plant resources during the late Holocene was far greater than has been interpreted. 

Keyword Archaeology -- Queensland -- Moreton Bay Region

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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