Mastery motivation in children with Down Syndrome: promoting and sustaining interest in learning

Gilmore, Linda and Cuskelly, Monica (2014). Mastery motivation in children with Down Syndrome: promoting and sustaining interest in learning. In Rhonda Faragher and Barbara Clarke (Ed.), Educating Learners with Down Syndrome: Research, theory, and practice with children and adolescents (pp. 60-82) Abingdon, Oxon, U.K.: Routledge.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Gilmore, Linda
Cuskelly, Monica
Title of chapter Mastery motivation in children with Down Syndrome: promoting and sustaining interest in learning
Title of book Educating Learners with Down Syndrome: Research, theory, and practice with children and adolescents
Place of Publication Abingdon, Oxon, U.K.
Publisher Routledge
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780415816366
9780415816373
9781315883588
9781134673353
9781306075107
Editor Rhonda Faragher
Barbara Clarke
Chapter number 3
Start page 60
End page 82
Total pages 23
Total chapters 12
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Using the framework of mastery motivation, this chapter introduces the complex construct of motivation and highlights its importance for children's learning. As demonstrated for typically developing children, mastery motivation has been shown to be an important predictor of academic outcomes for children with Down syndrome. Although deficits in motivation are sometimes presumed to be part of the learning and behavioural profile of Down syndrome, most of the empirical evidence shows no differences in mastery motivation when children with Down syndrome are compared to typically developing children of the same developmental level. By contrast, parent reports consistently suggest that children with Down syndrome have difficulties with motivation, possibly because parents arc making comparisons with their child's same-age peers rather than with children of similar developmental levels. Drawing on a wider research base, the chapter considers the child and environmental characteristics that influence mastery motivation. Children with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities experience a range of health, sensory, and motor difficulties that may interfere with their motivation for mastery. Children's beliefs about their own ability, the attributions they make for success and failure, and their expectancy about future success are all likely to impact on approaches to learning tasks. In addition, the difficulties many children with Down syndrome have in relation to self-regulating their attention, learning, and behaviour are likely to undermine their mastery motivation. Although some of these individual characteristics are intrinsic to the child, many are influenced or modified by the contexts in which chiildren live and learn. Within these contexts, of particular importance is giving children the opportunity to engage with cognitively stimulating activities. Other important environmental influences on motivation are adult attitudes and expectations, structure, positive reinforcement, and support for child auronomy. The chapter concludes with strategies for promoting and sustaining children's interest in learning, and recommendations for future research.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 12 Dec 2013, 12:15:47 EST by Claire Backhouse on behalf of School of Education