How was the Australian flora assembled over the last 65 million years? A molecular phylogenetic perspective

Crisp, Michael D. and Cook, Lyn G. (2013) How was the Australian flora assembled over the last 65 million years? A molecular phylogenetic perspective. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, 44 303-324. doi:10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-110512-135910


Author Crisp, Michael D.
Cook, Lyn G.
Title How was the Australian flora assembled over the last 65 million years? A molecular phylogenetic perspective
Journal name Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-592X
1545-2069
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-110512-135910
Volume 44
Start page 303
End page 324
Total pages 22
Place of publication Palo Alto, CA United States
Publisher Annual Reviews
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 1105 Dentistry
2303 Ecology
Abstract Australia has a mostly dry, open, fire-shaped landscape of sclerophyllous and xeromorphic flora dominated by eucalypt and acacia trees, with diverse shrubs from a few families such as Myrtaceae, Proteaceae, and Fabaceae. Using molecular phylogenies to test hypotheses derived from the fossil record, we review the principal forces that transformed the ancestral Gondwanan rainforest through the Cenozoic. Today's vegetation is a mix of ancient radiations that have persisted in Australia through dramatic climate change since before the breakup of Gondwana, and more recent lineages whose ancestors arrived by trans-oceanic dispersal. Signatures in the fossil record of lineage turnover and trait evolutionary change are detected in phylogenies, but often at earlier dates. The Australian biota is a sample of the wider region, with extinction of some taxa and radiation of others (due to chance and opportunity), but biotic and abiotic interactions have resulted in a unique flora and fauna. © Copyright
Keyword Climate change
Dispersal
Diversification
Ecological opportunity
Fire
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 29 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 10 Dec 2013, 01:06:02 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences