Systematic review of the quality of clinical guidelines for aphasia in stroke management

Rohde, Alexia, Worrall, Linda and Le Dorze, Guylaine (2013) Systematic review of the quality of clinical guidelines for aphasia in stroke management. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 19 6: 994-1003. doi:10.1111/jep.12023


Author Rohde, Alexia
Worrall, Linda
Le Dorze, Guylaine
Title Systematic review of the quality of clinical guidelines for aphasia in stroke management
Journal name Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1356-1294
1365-2753
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/jep.12023
Volume 19
Issue 6
Start page 994
End page 1003
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
2719 Health Policy
Abstract Rationaleaims and objectives Aphasia affects up to 38% of stroke survivors. Clinical guidelines can improve patient care and outcomes. Given the importance of aphasia management in stroke care, the purpose of this study was to systematically search for, retrieve and assess the quality of currently published clinical guidelines for aphasia in stroke management. Method Systematic search of bibliographic resources, publications, association websites, databases, Internet and pearling revealed multidisciplinary stroke and speech pathology-specific clinical guidelines, which were evaluated using the Appraisal of Guidelines and Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II tool. Guidelines obtaining a rigour of development score above 66.67% in AGREE II evaluations underwent further ADAPTE Collaboration tool analysis. Results There was significant variability in methodological rigour, reporting of guideline development processes and scope of coverage of recommendations pertaining to aphasia management provided within the guidelines. The Australian Clinical Guidelines for Stroke Management (2010) and New Zealand Clinical Guidelines for Stroke Management (2010) achieved the highest scores (74% and 81%, respectively) in AGREE II analysis and both obtained a 'yes' in all seven ADAPTE domains. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network 108 (2008) guideline achieved 73% in AGREE II and six out of seven 'yes' in ADAPTE, however, contained no aphasia-specific recommendations. The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (2005) guideline provided the most comprehensive aphasia coverage, however, demonstrated lower methodological rigour in AGREE II (64%) and ADAPTE evaluations (three 'yes' out of seven). Conclusion Improvement is needed in the quality of methodological rigour in development and reporting within clinical guidelines, and in aphasia-specific recommendations within stroke multidisciplinary clinical guidelines.
Keyword Aphasia
Clinical practice guidelines
Evidence-based practice
Stroke
Systematic review
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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