Return to driving in the first 6 months of community integration after acquired brain injury

Fleming, Jennifer, Liddle, Jacki, Nalder, Emily, Weir, Nicole and Cornwell, Petrea (2014) Return to driving in the first 6 months of community integration after acquired brain injury. NeuroRehabilitation, 34 1: 157-166. doi:10.3233/NRE-131012

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Author Fleming, Jennifer
Liddle, Jacki
Nalder, Emily
Weir, Nicole
Cornwell, Petrea
Title Return to driving in the first 6 months of community integration after acquired brain injury
Journal name NeuroRehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1053-8135
1878-6448
Publication date 2014
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3233/NRE-131012
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 34
Issue 1
Start page 157
End page 166
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher I O S Press
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
BACKGROUND:
Return to driving is a goal and milestone in the recovery process following acquired brain injury (ABI). Knowledge of whether and when a person is likely to return to driving is important to people with ABI, family members and clinicians.

OBJECTIVE:
To determine the rates, timing, correlates, and predictors of return to driving in the first 6 months after discharge from hospital following ABI.

METHODS:
Survey of 212 participants with ABI and 121 family members at discharge and 3 and 6 months later. Participants with ABI were grouped according to driving status (not driving, returned within 3 months, returned within 6 months). Groups were compared on demographics, injury severity, quality of life, functioning, psychosocial integration, depression, and carer well-being.

RESULTS:
By 6 months post-discharge 62.3% had resumed driving. Between group differences existed on measures of injury severity, and psychosocial integration at 6 months, and carer depression and strain at discharge and 6 months. Whether and when someone returned to driving could be predicted by length of hospital stay, and level of community integration, and pain at discharge.

CONCLUSIONS:
Educating clients about their likelihood and timing of return to driving, and supporting non-drivers and their carers may improve psychosocial outcomes.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Online Date: Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Dec 2013, 12:13:58 EST by Roheen Gill on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research