Why you cannot map attention: a relational theory of attention and eye movements

Becker, Stefanie I. (2013) Why you cannot map attention: a relational theory of attention and eye movements. Australian Psychologist, 48 6: 389-398. doi:10.1111/ap.12028


Author Becker, Stefanie I.
Title Why you cannot map attention: a relational theory of attention and eye movements
Journal name Australian Psychologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0067
1742-9544
Publication date 2013-12
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/ap.12028
Volume 48
Issue 6
Start page 389
End page 398
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract How do we select relevant information from cluttered visual environments? Current theories of attention and eye movement control have proposed a framework of feature detectors that allows us to attend to potentially important information and ignore irrelevant information. Each feature detector supposedly signals the existence of a single elementary feature (e.g., red) in the environment and can be modulated by the intention to search for particular features. In contrast to these feature detector accounts, recent visual search studies show that features are encoded relative to other features in the surround, in a context-dependent manner. Attention and eye movements are attracted to items with appropriate relative features (e.g., redder/larger/darker), regardless of their feature value. These findings question the feature detector concept and argue for a relational account of attention and eye movements.
Keyword Attention
Eye movement
Gaze
Relational theory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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