Reconsidering the crisis of confidence in indigenous African conflict resolution approaches: a postcolonial critique

Run, Peter (2013) Reconsidering the crisis of confidence in indigenous African conflict resolution approaches: a postcolonial critique. Journal of Pan African Studies, 6 6: 26-40.

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Author Run, Peter
Title Reconsidering the crisis of confidence in indigenous African conflict resolution approaches: a postcolonial critique
Journal name Journal of Pan African Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0888-6601
1942-6569
Publication date 2013-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 6
Issue 6
Start page 26
End page 40
Total pages 15
Place of publication Phoenix, AZ, United States
Publisher Journal of Pan African Studies
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Recent research on conflict resolution in Africa suggests that there is an emerging consensus, which indicate that shuttle diplomacy and externally initiated and monitored mediations do not work. This political reality made Africans pause for some introspection at the end of the Cold War because they realised, as President Mo (2006: vi) of Kenya put it, that “solutions to Africa’s problems will come from African themselves…” The result has been an output of a great wealth of common, internally accepted, socially legitimate and potentially more effective methods of African approaches to conflict resolution. Yet, many African leaders, who are influential conflict resolution specialists; and peacemaking institutions remain reticent about their worth in resolving the so-called modern conflicts (Zartman 2000) and embracing, instead, the praxis of centralised state power (Keller and Rothchild 1996; Bayart 2009; Maxted and Zegeye 2001). This article draws on the postcolonial genealogy to trace the source of this lack of confidence in African traditions of conflict resolution. It is argued that colonial ways of thinking are inhibiting the adoption of methods that have proven effective in reconciliation processes (e.g. the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa and Rwanda’s gacaca) currently look very promising at high level mediation (e.g., the role of the African Union in Kenya).
Keyword Africa
Conflict resolution
Post-colonialism
Genealogy
Marginalisation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 Dec 2013, 19:09:53 EST by Mr Peter Run on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies