A systematic review of peer-support programs for smoking cessation in disadvantaged groups

Ford, Pauline, Clifford, Anton, Gussy, Kim and Gartner, Coral (2013) A systematic review of peer-support programs for smoking cessation in disadvantaged groups. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 10 11: 5507-5522. doi:10.3390/ijerph10115507


Author Ford, Pauline
Clifford, Anton
Gussy, Kim
Gartner, Coral
Title A systematic review of peer-support programs for smoking cessation in disadvantaged groups
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Publication date 2013-10-28
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.3390/ijerph10115507
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue 11
Start page 5507
End page 5522
Total pages 16
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
2307 Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
Abstract The burden of smoking is borne most by those who are socially disadvantaged and the social gradient in smoking contributes substantially to the health gap between the rich and poor. A number of factors contribute to higher tobacco use among socially disadvantaged populations including social (e.g., low social support for quitting), psychological (e.g., low self-efficacy) and physical factors (e.g., greater nicotine dependence). Current evidence for the effectiveness of peer or partner support interventions in enhancing the success of quit attempts in the general population is equivocal, largely due to study design and lack of a theoretical framework in this research. We conducted a systematic review of peer support interventions for smoking cessation in disadvantaged groups. The eight studies which met the inclusion criteria showed that interventions that improve social support for smoking cessation may be of greater importance to disadvantaged groups who experience fewer opportunities to access such support informally. Peer-support programs are emerging as highly effective and empowering ways for people to manage health issues in a socially supportive context. We discuss the potential for peer-support programs to address the high prevalence of smoking in vulnerable populations and also to build capacity in their communities.
Keyword Cessation
Disadvantaged populations
Peer-support
Smoking
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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