Sex Differences in Smoking-related Risk of Vascular Disease and All-cause Mortality

Peters, Sanne A. E., van der Schouw, Yvonne T., Woodward, Mark and Huxley, Rachel R. (2013) Sex Differences in Smoking-related Risk of Vascular Disease and All-cause Mortality. Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, 7 6: 473-479. doi:10.1007/s12170-013-0339-4

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Author Peters, Sanne A. E.
van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
Woodward, Mark
Huxley, Rachel R.
Title Sex Differences in Smoking-related Risk of Vascular Disease and All-cause Mortality
Journal name Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-9520
1932-9563
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/s12170-013-0339-4
Open Access Status
Volume 7
Issue 6
Start page 473
End page 479
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Springer Healthcare
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2736 Pharmacology (medical)
3004 Pharmacology
Abstract Tobacco exposure is one of world's leading causes of death and illness and traditionally affected more men than women. However, the twenty first century burden of smoking might become disproportionally larger in women than in men for two reasons. First, as the smoking epidemic reached its peak decades earlier in men than in women, previous studies on female smoking-related hazards are highly likely have underestimated the full eventual impact of smoking on mortality in women because of the lengthy time lag between smoking uptake and disease onset in middle and old age. Second, findings from large contemporary studies suggest that the full health hazards of prolonged smoking are at least as great as, and potentially even greater, among women who smoke compared with men who smoke. Moreover, quitting smoking is equally beneficial in men and women all across the world. Future studies that attempt to identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the greater risk observed in women compared with men who smoke are warranted. Clinically, physicians and health professionals should be encouraged to further increase their efforts at promoting smoking cessation in men and women.
Keyword Coronary heart disease
Mortality
Sex differences
Smoking
Stroke
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Public Health Publications
 
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