A collaborative approach to address the cumulative impacts of mine-water discharge: Negotiating a cross-sectoral waterway partnership in the Bowen Basin, Australia

Eberhard, Rachel, Johnston, Nathan and Everingham, Jo-Anne (2013) A collaborative approach to address the cumulative impacts of mine-water discharge: Negotiating a cross-sectoral waterway partnership in the Bowen Basin, Australia. Resources Policy, 38 4: 678-687. doi:10.1016/j.resourpol.2013.02.002


Author Eberhard, Rachel
Johnston, Nathan
Everingham, Jo-Anne
Title A collaborative approach to address the cumulative impacts of mine-water discharge: Negotiating a cross-sectoral waterway partnership in the Bowen Basin, Australia
Journal name Resources Policy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-4207
1873-7641
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.resourpol.2013.02.002
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 38
Issue 4
Start page 678
End page 687
Total pages 10
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2002 Cultural Studies
2308 Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
3308 Law
3312 Sociology and Political Science
Abstract The social and environmental impacts of rapidly expanding coal and gas industries have generated high levels of public concern and there is increasing evidence of cumulative impacts. In the Bowen Basin of Queensland (Australia) water quality issues have triggered a collaborative response to coordinate monitoring efforts, integrate data and information and undertake regional analysis to inform landscape-scale management. Collaborative governance is promoted as a response to complex environmental problems, such as cumulative impacts. However, application of this approach to the resources and energy sectors remains a significant research gap. This paper reports the results of action research in the 2 years taken to negotiate the establishment of collaborative governance arrangements to address mine-water discharge impacts in the Bowen Basin. The long establishment phase has been required to refine objectives, build trust, develop governance mechanisms and secure resourcing commitments. The partnership established involves more than 20 organisations including regulators, resources and energy companies, agricultural industries and research organisations. The breadth of participating sectors is a significant innovation, but also represents a major challenge in establishing this model of regional environmental governance. Promising strategies adopted to manage these tensions have included neutral brokerage, facilitative leadership, establishing legitimacy of the collaboration and credibility of its reports. The case study provides a cautionary tale of the pursuit of the promise of 'everyone working together' to address cumulative impacts. Policy implications include the need for extended commitment and integration of collaborative and other responses.
Keyword Collaboration
Cumulative effects assessment and management (CEAM)
Cumulative impacts
Natural resource management
Resource governance
Water quality monitoring
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining Publications
Official 2014 Collection
Sustainable Minerals Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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