The harm principle and recognition theory: On the complementarity between Linklater, Honneth and the project of emancipation

Brincat, Shannon (2013) The harm principle and recognition theory: On the complementarity between Linklater, Honneth and the project of emancipation. Critical Horizons, 14 2: 225-256. doi:10.1179/1440991713Z.0000000001

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Author Brincat, Shannon
Title The harm principle and recognition theory: On the complementarity between Linklater, Honneth and the project of emancipation
Journal name Critical Horizons   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-9917
1568-5160
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1179/1440991713Z.0000000001
Open Access Status
Volume 14
Issue 2
Start page 225
End page 256
Total pages 32
Place of publication Durham, United Kingdom
Publisher Acumen Publishing Ltd
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 3312 Sociology and Political Science
1211 Philosophy
Abstract This paper explores potential points of synthesis between two leading theorists in Critical Theory and Critical International Relations Theory, Axel Honneth and Andrew Linklater. Whereas Linklater's recent work on the harm principle has turned away from the critical social theory of the Frankfurt School in favour of Norbert Elias and process sociology, the paper observes a fundamental complementarity between harm and the precepts of recognition theory that can bridge these otherwise disparate approaches to emancipation. The paper begins with a brief overview of Linklater's emancipatory vision before examining his recent turn to the harm principle and Eliasian process sociology. It is argued that Honneth's work, particularly the ideas of mutual recognition and the diagnosis of social pathologies, clearly resonant with Linklater's defence of ethical universalism and can help further the emancipatory project of Critical International Relations Theory. In particular, Honneth's intersubjective concept of autonomy is argued to provide a normative and empirical standard for emancipation premised on the historically progressive expansion of attitudes of recognition, born out of social struggles, toward the ideal institutionalisation of mutual recognition in world politics.
Keyword Critical Theory
Emancipation
Harm
Honneth
Linklater
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 28 Nov 2013, 21:08:26 EST by System User on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies