Do root exudates exert more influence on rhizosphere bacterial community structure than other rhizodeposits?

Hirsch, Penny R., Miller, Anthony J. and Dennis, Paul G. (2013). Do root exudates exert more influence on rhizosphere bacterial community structure than other rhizodeposits?. In Frans J. de Bruijn (Ed.), Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere (pp. 229-242) Hoboken, NJ United States: Wiley-Blackwell. doi:10.1002/9781118297674.ch22


Author Hirsch, Penny R.
Miller, Anthony J.
Dennis, Paul G.
Title of chapter Do root exudates exert more influence on rhizosphere bacterial community structure than other rhizodeposits?
Title of book Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere
Place of Publication Hoboken, NJ United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1002/9781118297674.ch22
Open Access Status
Year available 2013
ISBN 9781118296172
9781118297674
Editor Frans J. de Bruijn
Volume number 1 and 2
Chapter number 22
Start page 229
End page 242
Total pages 14
Total chapters 118
Collection year 2014
Subjects 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
2300 Environmental Science
Abstract/Summary Root exudates are credited with having a major influence on the structure of rhizosphere bacterial communities. However, evidence indicates that direct influence of root exudates on bacterial communities is limited to small spatiotemporal windows surrounding root apices. Furthermore, root exudates are modified upon assimilation by microorganisms, prior to rerelease into the rhizosphere. Also, many of the compounds that dominate root exudates are ubiquitous in the rhizosphere and arise from microbial metabolites and rhizodeposits other than exudates. Consequently, rhizosphere carbon pools associated with regions of roots other than apices are unlikely to be dominated by root exudates. Thus, it is important to consider all carbon pools in the rhizosphere as potential drivers of microbial community structure. This has implications for the distribution of rhizosphere bacteria and should factor as an important consideration in the development of effective strategies for managing beneficial plant-microbe interactions.
Keyword Microbial ecology
Rhizodeposition
Rhizosphere
Root exudation
Soil
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 28 Nov 2013, 21:03:38 EST by System User on behalf of Advanced Water Management Centre