"Now, I'm magazine detective the whole time": Listening and responding to young people's complex experiences of popular physical culture

Enright, Eimear and O'Sullivan, Mary (2013) "Now, I'm magazine detective the whole time": Listening and responding to young people's complex experiences of popular physical culture. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 32 4: 394-418.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ318110OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 683.23KB 82
Author Enright, Eimear
O'Sullivan, Mary
Title "Now, I'm magazine detective the whole time": Listening and responding to young people's complex experiences of popular physical culture
Journal name Journal of Teaching in Physical Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0273-5024
1543-2769
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 32
Issue 4
Start page 394
End page 418
Total pages 25
Place of publication Champaign, IL United States
Publisher Human Kinetics, Inc.
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2732 Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
3612 Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
3304 Education
Abstract Popular physical culture serves as a site, subject and medium for young people's learning (Sandford & Rich, 2006) and impacts their relationship with physical education, physical activity and the construction of their embodied identities. This paper addresses the potential of scrapbooking as a pedagogical and methodological tool to facilitate physical education researchers and teachers to listen to, and better understand and respond to extend students' existing knowledge of, and critical engagement with popular physical culture. The data draws from a three year Participatory Action Research project that was undertaken in an urban, secondary school and was designed to engage 41 girls (aged 15-19) in understanding, critiquing and transforming aspects of their lives that influenced their perspectives of their bodies and their physical activity and physical education engagement. In this paper the focus is on the engagement of eleven of these girls in a five week popular physical culture unit. The students' scrapbooks, audio-recordings of classes, a guided conversation, and field notes constitute the data sources. Findings suggest scrapbooking has the potential to allow researchers access, understand and respond to students' perspectives on popular physical culture and their lives in a way that other methods may not. Pedagogically, scrapbooking supported students in critically appraising and making meaning of "scraps" of popular physical culture.
Keyword Bodies
Critical health literacy
Media
Participatory visual methods
Student voice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 28 Nov 2013, 20:36:36 EST by System User on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences