Random breath testing in Queensland and Western Australia: examination of how the random breath testing rate influences alcohol related traffic crash rates

Ferris, Jason, Mazerolle, Lorraine, King, Mark, Bates, Lyndel, Bennett, Sarah and Devaney, Madonna (2013) Random breath testing in Queensland and Western Australia: examination of how the random breath testing rate influences alcohol related traffic crash rates. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 60 181-188. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2013.08.018

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ317999OA.docx Full text (open access) Click to show the corresponding preview/stream application/vnd.openxmlf... 143.43KB 0

Author Ferris, Jason
Mazerolle, Lorraine
King, Mark
Bates, Lyndel
Bennett, Sarah
Devaney, Madonna
Title Random breath testing in Queensland and Western Australia: examination of how the random breath testing rate influences alcohol related traffic crash rates
Journal name Accident Analysis and Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-4575
1879-2057
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2013.08.018
Open Access Status
Volume 60
Start page 181
End page 188
Total pages 8
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
2213 Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
3307 Human Factors and Ergonomics
3308 Law
Abstract In this paper we explore the relationship between monthly random breath testing (RBT) rates (per 1000 licensed drivers) and alcohol-related traffic crash (ARTC) rates over time, across two Australian states: Queensland and Western Australia. We analyse the RBT, ARTC and licensed driver rates across 12 years; however, due to administrative restrictions, we model ARTC rates against RBT rates for the period July 2004 to June 2009. The Queensland data reveals that the monthly ARTC rate is almost flat over the five year period. Based on the results of the analysis, an average of 5.5 ARTCs per 100,000 licensed drivers are observed across the study period. For the same period, the monthly rate of RBTs per 1000 licensed drivers is observed to be decreasing across the study with the results of the analysis revealing no significant variations in the data. The comparison between Western Australia and Queensland shows that Queensland's ARTC monthly percent change (MPC) is 0.014 compared to the MPC of 0.47 for Western Australia. While Queensland maintains a relatively flat ARTC rate, the ARTC rate in Western Australia is increasing. Our analysis reveals an inverse relationship between ARTC RBT rates, that for every 10% increase in the percentage of RBTs to licensed driver there is a 0.15 decrease in the rate of ARTCs per 100,000 licenced drivers. Moreover, in Western Australia, if the 2011 ratio of 1:2 (RBTs to annual number of licensed drivers) were to double to a ratio of 1:1, we estimate the number of monthly ARTCs would reduce by approximately 15. Based on these findings we believe that as the number of RBTs conducted increases the number of drivers willing to risk being detected for drinking driving decreases, because the perceived risk of being detected is considered greater. This is turn results in the number of ARTCs diminishing. The results of this study provide an important evidence base for policy decisions for RBT operations.
Keyword Alcohol
Crashes
Deterrence
Drink driving
Random breath testing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 28 Nov 2013, 19:59:05 EST by System User on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research