Insights into the dynamics of oral lubrication and mouthfeel using soft tribology: Differentiating semi-fluid foods with similar rheology

Selway, Nichola and Stokes, Jason R. (2013) Insights into the dynamics of oral lubrication and mouthfeel using soft tribology: Differentiating semi-fluid foods with similar rheology. Food Research International, 54 1: 423-431. doi:10.1016/j.foodres.2013.07.044


Author Selway, Nichola
Stokes, Jason R.
Title Insights into the dynamics of oral lubrication and mouthfeel using soft tribology: Differentiating semi-fluid foods with similar rheology
Journal name Food Research International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0963-9969
1873-7145
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foodres.2013.07.044
Open Access Status
Volume 54
Issue 1
Start page 423
End page 431
Total pages 9
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract In-mouth lubrication or 'oral tribology' is believed to be a major contributor to the perception of surface-related mouthfeel attributes such as roughness and astringency. In this work, commercial soft-food systems - custards, yogurts and thickened creams, each formulated at varying fat levels with the aim of maintaining consumer acceptability - are characterized using rheology and soft tribology to gain insight into the physical origins of mouthfeel and the dynamics of oral lubrication, including the role of saliva. It is shown that, despite generating similar bulk rheological profiles (oscillatory and steady shear flow properties), foods within each product series exhibit unique tribological properties, attributed to the preferential entrainment of different phases and components at narrow gap. Food-saliva interactions are also shown to play a crucial role in determining transient lubrication properties, which may reflect dynamic oral processes. We explore the use of tribology to differentiate rheologically similar products as a starting point to develop improved approaches for investigating tribological processes occurring in the mouth during food consumption. Challenges associated with the application of tribology in this context are also discussed.
Keyword Emulsion
Friction
Lubrication
Rheology
Saliva
Tribology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Chemical Engineering Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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