Water savings and coal product compromise

Vink, S. and Moran, C. (2010). Water savings and coal product compromise. In: XXV International Mineral Processing Congress 2010 (IMPC 2010): Proceedings. 25th International Mineral Processing Congress 2010 (IMPC 2010), Brisbane, Australia, (4109-4116). 6-10 September 2010.

Author Vink, S.
Moran, C.
Title of paper Water savings and coal product compromise
Conference name 25th International Mineral Processing Congress 2010 (IMPC 2010)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 6-10 September 2010
Proceedings title XXV International Mineral Processing Congress 2010 (IMPC 2010): Proceedings
Journal name XXV International Mineral Processing Congress 2010, IMPC 2010
Place of Publication Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM)
Publisher Carlton South, VIC, Australia
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781617820519
Volume 5
Start page 4109
End page 4116
Total pages 8
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Water re-use has become a necessity for coal preparation on most coal mines sites in Australia. As a consequence CHPP operators have had to modify procedures to cope with higher salinity process water. While using salty water has been shown to provide flotation benefits, concerns over the compromise to product quality due to uptake of Na into the coal have remained. A technique was developed that could be used on mine sites to quantify salt uptake and release from coal during processing. Tests were conducted on coals from 14 sites from the Bowen Basin, Hunter Valley and Illawarra. Results showed that in general salt uptake and release was a linear function of the salt concentration of the initial solution. Salt was released from all coals in deionised water and taken up by the coal as the solution salt concentration increased. In general, Na content of the coals during these experiments increased on the order of ~10 per cent depending on the conductivity of the water used during processing. This work has shown that in most cases the compromise to product quality is likely to be relatively small. Consequently, concerns around product quality should present less of a constraint to using salty water in the CHPP and water re-use should be actively promoted as part of the water management strategy for coal preparation on sites. Clearly for sites were the coal has a high Na content before processing, even a small increase may represent a threat to product quality. This threat could be assessed routinely on site using the method described in this work.
Keyword Coal product
Flotation
Ion uptake/release
Saline water
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Sustainable Minerals Institute Publications
 
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