Closing the feedback loop: engaging students in large first-year mathematics test revision sessions using pen-enabled screens

Donovan, Diane and Loch, Birgit (2013) Closing the feedback loop: engaging students in large first-year mathematics test revision sessions using pen-enabled screens. International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 44 1: 1-13. doi:10.1080/0020739X.2012.678898


Author Donovan, Diane
Loch, Birgit
Title Closing the feedback loop: engaging students in large first-year mathematics test revision sessions using pen-enabled screens
Journal name International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-739X
1464-5211
Publication date 2013-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0020739X.2012.678898
Open Access Status
Volume 44
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subject 2604 Applied Mathematics
2601 Mathematics (miscellaneous)
3304 Education
Abstract How can active learning, peer learning and prompt feedback be achieved in large first-year mathematics classes? Further, what technologies may support these aims? In this article, we assert that test revision sessions in first-year mathematics held in a technology-enhanced lecture theatre can be highly interactive with students solving problems, learning from each other and receiving immediate feedback. This is facilitated by pen-enabled screens and synchronization software. We argue that the educational benefits achievable through the technology do outweigh the technological distractions, and that these benefits can be achieved by focused, targeted one-off sessions and not only by a semester-long, regular approach. Repeat mid-semester test revision sessions were offered on a non-compulsory basis using pen-enabled screens for all students. Students worked practice test questions and marked solutions to mathematical problems on the screens. Students' work was then displayed anonymously for their peers to see. Answers were discussed with the whole class. We discuss outcomes from two offerings of these sessions using student feedback and lecturer reflections and show the impact of participation on self-reported student confidence. Pedagogical approaches that the technology allowed for the first time in a large class are highlighted. Students responded uniformly positively.
Keyword Active learning
Large classes
Peer learning
Prompt feedback
Tablet technology
Undergraduate mathematics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Physical Sciences Publications
 
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