Welfare-to-work Policies and the Experience of Employed Single Mothers on Income Support in Australia: Where are the Benefits?

Grahame, Teresa and Marston, Greg (2012) Welfare-to-work Policies and the Experience of Employed Single Mothers on Income Support in Australia: Where are the Benefits?. Australian Social Work, 65 1: 73-86. doi:10.1080/0312407X.2011.604093


Author Grahame, Teresa
Marston, Greg
Title Welfare-to-work Policies and the Experience of Employed Single Mothers on Income Support in Australia: Where are the Benefits?
Journal name Australian Social Work   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0312-407X
1447-0748
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0312407X.2011.604093
Open Access Status
Volume 65
Issue 1
Start page 73
End page 86
Total pages 14
Place of publication Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Routledge
Abstract In July 2006, "welfare-to-work" policies were introduced for single parents in Australia. These policies require most single parents with school-aged children to be employed or seeking employment of 15 to 25 hours per week in return for their income support payment. The changes represented a sharp increase in the obligations applying to single parents on income support. This paper is concerned with how the wellbeing of single mothers who are combining income support and paid employment is being influenced by these stepped-up activity requirements. The paper draws on data from semistructured interviews with 21 Brisbane single mothers. The analysis explores participants' experiences in the new policy environment, utilising the theoretical framework of "relational autonomy". Relational approaches to autonomy emphasise the importance of relations of dependency and interdependency to the development of autonomy and wellbeing in contrast with more individualistic approaches that privilege independence and self-sufficiency. Findings indicate that in their dealings with the welfare bureaucracy, participants experienced a lack of recognition of their identities as mothers, paid workers, and competent decision makers. These experiences have negative consequences for self-worth, relational autonomy, and ultimately the wellbeing of single parent families.
Keyword Recognition
Relational Autonomy
Single Mothers
Welfare
Work
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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