'Too much sitting' and metabolic risk - Has modern technology caught up with us?

Dunstan, D. W., Healy, G. N., Sugiyama, T. and Owen, N. (2009) 'Too much sitting' and metabolic risk - Has modern technology caught up with us?. US Endocrinology, 5 29-33.

Author Dunstan, D. W.
Healy, G. N.
Sugiyama, T.
Owen, N.
Title 'Too much sitting' and metabolic risk - Has modern technology caught up with us?
Journal name US Endocrinology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1758-3918
1758-3926
Publication date 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 5
Start page 29
End page 33
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Touch Medical Media
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 2712 Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Abstract Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that prolonged sitting (sedentary behaviour: time spent in behaviours that have very low energy expenditure, such as television viewing and desk-bound work) has deleterious cardiovascular and metabolic correlates, which are present even among adults who meet physical activity and health guidelines. Further advances in communication technology and other labour-saving innovations make it likely that the ubiquitous opportunities for sedentary behaviour that currently exist will become even more prevalent in the future. We present evidence that sedentary behaviour (too much sitting) is an important stand-alone component of the physical activity and health equation, particularly in relation to cardio-metabolic risk, and discuss whether it is now time to consider public health and clinical guidelines on reducing prolonged sitting time that are in addition to those promoting regular participation in physical activity.
Keyword Cardio metabolic risk
Physical inactivity
Sedentary behaviour
Sitting time
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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