Workplace envy: the methodological challenges of capturing a denied and concealed emotion

McGrath, Donna-Louise (2011) Workplace envy: the methodological challenges of capturing a denied and concealed emotion. International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 6 1: 81-90.

Author McGrath, Donna-Louise
Title Workplace envy: the methodological challenges of capturing a denied and concealed emotion
Journal name International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1833-1882
Publication date 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 6
Issue 1
Start page 81
End page 90
Total pages 10
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Common Ground Publishing
Language eng
Subject 3300 Social Sciences
Formatted abstract
Envy is a universal human emotion which has increasing interdisciplinary significance in the social sciences. In the organisational setting, envy can be ubiquitous and has often been associated with employee deviance, counterproductive workplace behaviours and bullying. This harmful view of envy can be explained from a psychoanalytic perspective; characterised by feelings of ill will toward the envied person. However comparatively few measures have been developed to capture these feelings of envious hostility. This is most likely because envy is a disguised emotion; hence presenting the researcher with methodological challenges to directly capturing the construct. In fact very few people will admit to being envious of others. The aim of this paper is thus to assess the extent to which existing measures capture the psychoanalytic view of envy and to consider their use in organisational contexts - where envy may be hostile. In doing so, several issues are investigated, firstly in terms of capturing the affect of envious anger, and secondly, in terms of research sampling. The paper concludes with some suggested methodological directions for future research on workplace envy.
Keyword Anger
Emotions
Envy
Research Methodology
Response Bias
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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