Patient preference for falls prevention in hospitals revealed through willingness-to-pay, contingent valuation survey

Haines, Terry P. and McPhail, Steven (2011) Patient preference for falls prevention in hospitals revealed through willingness-to-pay, contingent valuation survey. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 17 2: 304-310. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01441.x


Author Haines, Terry P.
McPhail, Steven
Title Patient preference for falls prevention in hospitals revealed through willingness-to-pay, contingent valuation survey
Journal name Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1356-1294
1365-2753
Publication date 2011-04
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01441.x
Open Access Status
Volume 17
Issue 2
Start page 304
End page 310
Total pages 7
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
2719 Health Policy
Formatted abstract
Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient preference for interventions aimed at preventing in-hospital falls has not previously been investigated. This study aims to contrast the amount patients are willing to pay to prevent falls through six intervention approaches.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional willingness-to-pay (WTP), contingent valuation survey conducted among hospital inpatients (n = 125) during their first week on a geriatric rehabilitation unit in Queensland, Australia. Contingent valuation scenarios were constructed for six falls prevention interventions: a falls consultation, an exercise programme, a face-to-face education programme, a booklet and video education programme, hip protectors and a targeted, multifactorial intervention programme. The benefit to participants in terms of reduction in risk of falls was held constant (30% risk reduction) within each scenario.

Results: Participants valued the targeted, multifactorial intervention programme the highest [mean WTP (95% CI): $(AUD)268 ($240, $296)], followed by the falls consultation [$215 ($196, $234)], exercise [$174 ($156, $191)], face-to-face education [$164 ($146, $182)], hip protector [$74 ($62, $87)] and booklet and video education interventions [$68 ($57, $80)]. A 'cost of provision' bias was identified, which adversely affected the valuation of the booklet and video education intervention.

Conclusion: There may be considerable indirect and intangible costs associated with interventions to prevent falls in hospitals that can substantially affect patient preferences. These costs could substantially influence the ability of these interventions to generate a net benefit in a cost-benefit analysis.
Keyword Accidental falls
Contingent valuation
Cost-benefit
Hospitals
Injury prevention
Survey
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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