Aerodynamic design of hypersonic re-entry flight HIFiRE 7

Eggers, Thino, Silvester, Todd B., Paull, Allan and Smart, Michael K. (2009). Aerodynamic design of hypersonic re-entry flight HIFiRE 7. In: 16th AIAA/DLR/DGLR International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference; [papers]. 16th AIAA/DLR/DGLR International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference, Bremen, Germany, (). 19 - 22 October 2009. doi:10.2514/6.2009-7256


Author Eggers, Thino
Silvester, Todd B.
Paull, Allan
Smart, Michael K.
Title of paper Aerodynamic design of hypersonic re-entry flight HIFiRE 7
Conference name 16th AIAA/DLR/DGLR International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference
Conference location Bremen, Germany
Conference dates 19 - 22 October 2009
Proceedings title 16th AIAA/DLR/DGLR International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference; [papers]
Series AIAA meeting papers on disc, [14.]2009,12
Place of Publication Reston, VA United States
Publisher AIAA
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Other
DOI 10.2514/6.2009-7256
ISBN 9781600867408
Total pages 1
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The HIFiRE (Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation) program is a collaboration between the Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) and the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) to develop and demonstrate fundamental hypersonic technologies, through computational analysis, ground testing and flight testing. HIFiRE 7 is the first of the free-flyer scramjet flights scheduled for launch in October 2010. It is an uncontrolled ballistic re-entry experiment to measure thrust generated from two REST (Rectangular-to-Elliptical Shape Transition) inlet scramjets mounted back-to-back. The HIFiRE 7 payload will be launched aboard a spin-stabilized two-stage sounding rocket, utilizing an up-and-over ballistic trajectory. During the re-entry phase, the payload will separate from the sustainer and continue as a free-flyer. The flight experiment will take place at Mach 8 between altitudes of ∼34km and 26km. This paper presents an overview the aerodynamic design of the free-flying vehicle from concept to the current configuration, including possible separation strategies. Copyright
Subjects 2200 Engineering
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Mechanical & Mining Engineering Publications
 
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