Designing memory aids to facilitate intentions to deviate from routine in an air traffic control simulation

Loft, Shayne, Smith, Rebekah E. and Bhaskara, Adella (2009). Designing memory aids to facilitate intentions to deviate from routine in an air traffic control simulation. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009, San Antonio, TX, (56-60). 19 - 23 October 2009. doi:10.1177/154193120905300113


Author Loft, Shayne
Smith, Rebekah E.
Bhaskara, Adella
Title of paper Designing memory aids to facilitate intentions to deviate from routine in an air traffic control simulation
Conference name 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
Conference location San Antonio, TX
Conference dates 19 - 23 October 2009
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. Proceedings   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage Publications, Inc.
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1177/154193120905300113
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781615676231
ISSN 1071-1813
2169-5067
Volume 53
Issue 1
Start page 56
End page 60
Total pages 5
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In many occupations individuals need to remember to deviate from routine in order to perform intended actions, and a failure to do so can be catastrophic. The effectiveness of two memory aids was examined in an air traffic control simulation. After training on the air traffic control simulation, participants were instructed to press an alternative response key instead of a routine response key when accepting target aircraft into their sector. One type of memory aid presented this instruction constantly on the display screen. Despite this, individuals failed to deviate from routine just as often as when no such memory aid
were available. A second memory aid was designed to pulsate (flash) at the time deviation from routine was required. This memory aid improved prospective memory performance. Implications for the design of memory aids for occupations where individuals monitor dynamic multi-item display screens are discussed.  
Subjects 3307 Human Factors and Ergonomics
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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