Radish sprouts versus broccoli sprouts: A comparison of anti-cancer potential based on glucosinolate breakdown products

O'Hare, T. J., Williams, D. J., Zhang, B., Wong, L. S., Jarrett, S., Pun,S., Jorgensen, W. and Imsic, M. (2009) Radish sprouts versus broccoli sprouts: A comparison of anti-cancer potential based on glucosinolate breakdown products. Acta Horticulturae, 841 187-192.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author O'Hare, T. J.
Williams, D. J.
Zhang, B.
Wong, L. S.
Jarrett, S.
Pun,S.
Jorgensen, W.
Imsic, M.
Title Radish sprouts versus broccoli sprouts: A comparison of anti-cancer potential based on glucosinolate breakdown products
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0567-7572
ISBN 9789066056022
Publication date 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 841
Start page 187
End page 192
Total pages 6
Place of publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 1108 Medical Microbiology
Formatted abstract
 Radish sprouts and broccoli sprouts have been implicated in having a potential chemoprotective effect against certain types of cancer. Each contains a glucosinolate that can be broken down to an isothiocyanate capable of inducing chemoprotective factors known as phase 2 enzymes. In the case of broccoli, the glucosinolate, glucoraphanin, is converted to an isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, while in radish a similar glucosinolate, glucoraphenin, is broken down to form the isothiocyanate, sulforaphene. When sprouts are consumed fresh (uncooked), however, the principal degradation product of broccoli is not the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, but a nitrile, a compound with little anti-cancer potential. By contrast, radish sprouts produce largely the anti-cancer isothiocyanate, sulforaphene. The reason for this difference is likely to be due to the presence in broccoli (and absence in radish) of the enzyme cofactor, epithiospecifier protein (ESP). In vitro induction of the phase 2 enzyme, quinone reductase (QR), was significantly greater for radish sprouts than broccoli sprouts when extracts were self-hydrolysed. By contrast, boiled radish sprout extracts (deactivating ESP) to which myrosinase was subsequently added, induced similar QR activity to broccoli sprouts. The implication is that radish sprouts have potentially greater chemoprotective action against carcinogens than broccoli sprouts when hydrolysed under conditions similar to that during human consumption.
Keyword Epithiospecifier protein
Glucoraphanin
Glucoraphenin
Isothiocyanate
Sulforaphane
Sulforaphene
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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